Accounts Receivable Financing Verses Purchase Order Financing

Two types of alternative business financing that often get confused with one another are Accounts Receivable Financing and Purchase Order Financing. It’s understandable that they sometimes get confused, however, they are two very different types of alternative business financing that serve two very different purposes.

Accounts Receivable Financing is used when you have outstanding invoices on your aging report and want to access that cash now instead of waiting to be paid at a later date.  NOTE:  To qualify for Accounts Receivable Financing, your product or service must have been delivered and invoiced; otherwise there are no Accounts Receivable invoices to use as collateral. 

The two types of Accounts Receivable Financing most commonly used are Asset Based Lending and Factoring:

  • Asset Based Lending - You can get traditional bank financing or alternative business financing in the form of asset based lending.  If you qualify for bank financing, go that route first because the cost of capital will always be less than non-traditional asset based lending.  You receive a line of credit from a bank or non-bank lender and use your accounts receivable invoices as collateral for the line.  Each institution has different underwriting standards; however, the important thing to remember is that the strength of your company will still play a role in getting approved. 

    It will be not be possible to get bank financing if your business is losing money because banks are very conservative…and rightly so; they’re not making much money on your line compared to non-traditional lenders.  These non-traditional lenders will still have to qualify your company in the underwriting process (although less stringent) and have certain covenants tied to the line in order for it to stay open.

  • Factoring – This is a form of financing where a 3rd party purchases your accounts receivable invoices at a discount so you can receive working capital today instead of having to wait 30, 60 or 90 days to be paid.  Factoring is more flexible that asset based lending in the sense that you’re qualified based on the strength of your clients, not your financial strength.

Purchase Order Financing, also known as PO Financing, is used when capital is needed to fulfill an order after receiving a PO.  Smaller companies that start to receive larger orders can turn to this type of alternative financing to help sustain growth.  PO Financing only makes sense when profit margins are large enough to offset the cost of capital.  It can be costly; however, it’s still cheaper than equity.

So remember, Purchase Order Financing is used on the front end of a transaction and Accounts Receivable Financing is used on the back-end of a transaction.  If your company needs financing for growth or survival, these two types of financing may be very helpful financing tools. 

If you’d like to discuss your specific situation, please contact us.

Kevin McArdle is a Principal with CDK Capital, a boutique commercial finance firm that provides small to mid-size businesses alternative business financing strategies to help grow, improve cash flow & preserve capital. These strategies include Venture Capital Financing for technology companies, Accounts Receivable Financing for business experiencing cash flow problems, and Equipment Financing for buyers of capital equipment.

Insurance for Your Business

The importance of insurance cannot be over-emphasized and neither can the danger of paying for insurance you don’t need. It is strongly recommended you solicit the advice of an in-dependent business insurance agent. Don’t forget to SHOP! Talk to three or four independent agents and compare notes and prices. An insurance agent will lay out a vast array of insurance coverage much of which you simply may not need. Your situation will be unique and you must consider each insurance element carefully to ensure comprehensive coverage.

Whatever your final insurance program looks like, you should review it at least every six months. Your business can change rapidly, especially in the first few years and insurance needs change with it. Keep your program up to date by calling in your agent and reviewing your coverage. Make changes where necessary.

LIABILITY INSURANCE

This is probably the most important element of your insurance program. Liability insurance provides protection from potential
losses resulting from injury or damage to others or their property. Just recall some of the big cash awards you have read about that have resulted from lawsuits concerning liability of one kind or another and you will understand the importance of this insurance. Your insurance agent can describe the various types of liability insurance coverage that are available. If you will end up with a comprehensive general policy, make certain that the general policy does not include items you don’t need. Pay for only the insurance you need. For example, your business may not need product liability insurance.

Do not confuse business liability coverage with your personal liability coverage, both of which you need. Your personal coverage will not cover a business-generated liability. Check to be certain.

Compare the costs of different levels of coverage. In some cases a $2 million policy costs only slightly more than a $1 million policy. This economy of scale is true with most forms of insurance coverage. That is, after a certain value, additional insurance becomes very economical.

KEY PERSON INSURANCE

This type of insurance is particularly important for the sole proprietorship or partnership where the loss of one person through illness, accident, or death may render the business inoperative or severely limit its operations. This insurance, although not inexpensive, can provide protection for this situation. Key person insurance might also be necessary for others involved in your business.

SGC was a small firm run by three partners, a software programmer, marketer, and a general manager. Their product was a complex computer program used by aerospace firms. Al, the programmer, was involved in a severe automobile accident, became totally disabled, and SGC lost their programming capability. The problem was that the computer program written by Al was essentially the company’s sole product. Modifications to accommodate the customer became impossible and the time to bring another programmer up to speed was excessive. SGC lost considerable business as a result of this situation. These losses could have been offset by key person insurance.

DISABILITY INSURANCE

You, as a business owner, should be covered by disability insurance whether or not you decide on key person insurance. This insurance, along with business-interruption insurance, described below, will help ensure your business will continue to operate in the unfortunate situation where you are unable to work. Your disability insurance policy needs to provide satisfactory coverage. Particular attention should be paid to the definition of “disability,” delay time until payments start, when coverage terminates, and adjustments for inflation.

FIRE INSURANCE

Fire insurance, like all insurance is complicated and you should understand what IS and IS NOT covered. For example, a typical fire insurance policy covers the loss of contents but does not cover your losses from the fact that you may be out of business for 2-months while your facility is rebuilt. Fire insurance is mandatory whether you’re working out of a home office or you have a separate facility. You should discuss a comprehensive policy with your agent. Take the time to understand the details. For example, will the contents be insured for their replacement value or for actual value at the time of loss?

Consider a co-insurance clause that will reduce the policy cost considerably. This means that the insurance carrier will require you to carry insurance equal to some percentage of the value of your property. (Usually around 85%.) With this type of clause it is very important that you review coverage frequently so you always meet the minimum percentage required. If this minimum is not met, a loss will not be paid no matter what its value.

If you are working out of your home, your existing homeowner’s policy may not cover business property. If this is the case, have your insurance agent to add a home-office rider to your policy.

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE

You probably already have automobile insurance but it might not include business use of your vehicle. Make sure that it does.

WORKER’S COMPENSATION INSURANCE

If you make the decision to hire employees, you will be required, in most states, to cover them under worker’s compensation. The cost of this insurance varies widely and depends on the kind of work being performed and your accident history. It is important that you properly classify your employees to secure the lowest insurance rates. Work closely with your insurance agent.

BUSINESS INTERRUPTION INSURANCE

This protects against loss of revenue as the result of property damage. This insurance would be used, for instance, if you could not operate your business during the time repairs were being made as a result of a fire or in the event of the loss of a key supplier. The coverage can pay for salaries, taxes, and lost profits.

CREDIT INSURANCE

This will pay for unusual losses as the result of nonpayment of accounts receivables above a certain threshold. As with all policies, you must thoroughly understand the details so discuss it with your insurance agent. One of the largest providers of this coverage is American Credit Indemnity, Baltimore, MD. (800) 879 1224.

BURGLARY/ROBBERY/THEFT INSURANCE

Comprehensive policies are available that protect against loss from these perils, including by your own employees. Make certain you understand what is excluded from coverage.

RENT INSURANCE

This policy covers the cost of rent for other facilities in the event your property becomes damaged to the extent that operations cannot continue in your normal location.

DISABILITY INSURANCE

This insurance will pay you an amount each month slightly less than your current salary in the event you become disabled and are unable to work. Cost for this coverage varies considerably depending on your profession, salary level, how quickly benefits start, and when they end. Benefits paid are tax-free only if you, not your company, pay the premiums.

This list could be continued since it is possible to purchase insurance for just about any peril you can imagine … if you can pay the premium! When considering your insurance coverage, use the following checklist:

INSURANCE COVERAGE CHECKLIST:

o Can you afford the loss?

o What coverage is required by Federal, state, or local law?

o What SPECIFIC items are covered by the policy?

o Are items to be insured for their replacement cost or original value?

o What SPECIFIC items are EXCLUDED by the policy?

o If there is a co-insurance clause, do you have adequate coverage?

o Have you chosen deductibles wisely in order to minimize costs?

o Do any of the policies you are considering duplicate or overlap one another?

o Do you need any insurance based on location, e.g., flood, earthquake?

Use the following checklist to review your insurance plans:

INSURANCE PLAN CHECKLIST:

o Employ an independent insurance agent rather than going to individual insurance companies. Ensure the agent shops for your insurance.

o Talk to and get quotations from at least THREE agents and pick the best one for you.

o Use money saving comprehensive policies, if possible.

o Perform periodic (every 6-months) reviews of your insurance program.

o Have business assets professionally appraised to determine coverage needs.

o Ensure existing personal insurance coverage includes business-related activities and add riders as necessary or obtain additional coverage.

http://www.TotalBusiness.com is a Website that provides business owners with the information they need in order to successfully start, manage, grow, and sell their businesses.

The site features over 3,000 articles and 60 guides on business topics such as starting a business, financing a business, sales and marketing, building a website, setting up an office, hiring employees, and selling a business. The site also contains articles on legal and accounting issues affecting businesses and allows business owners and entrepreneurs to get free expert advice from local lawyers or accountants. The site contains over 1,000 business forms and agreements that are helpful to business owners and provides a business directory with over 1,700 merchants who provide services specifically for small businesses.

Eran Salu, JD,MBA,CPA is the Founder and CEO of TotalBusiness.com

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